MFBBN – Multiphoton Fabrication of Bioelectronic Biomaterials for Neuromodulation

Electromagnetic fields affect a variety of tissues (e.g. bone, muscle, nerve and skin) and play important roles in a multitude of biological processes. This has inspired the development of electrically conducting devices for biomedical applications, several examples of which have been clinically translated, including: cardiac pacemakers, bionic eyes, bionic ears and electrodes for deep brain stimulation. The MFBBN project aimed to use multiphoton fabrication to print electrically conducting polymer-based materials with nanoscale features that would enable the electrical stimulation of individual nerves, which may be used to treat a variety
of debilitating chronic diseases.

Project Objectives

  • Preparation of conducting polymer-based materials using multiphoton fabrication on hard and soft/flexible substrates.
  • Characterisation of the physicochemical and electrical properties of the materials.
  • Validation of the efficacy of the bioelectronic devices to interact with brain tissue ex vivo in collaboration with Frances Edwards at UCL Neuroscience.
Biological efficacy: Conducting polymer structure interacts with brain tissue

Key Achievements

The project achieved its aims and objectives by

  • printing conducting polymers on hard substrates and soft/flexible substrates, with micron- and nano- scale features and protruding contact points for a power source and biological tissue
  • demonstrated the biological utility of the structures by recording a physiological response to electrical stimulation of the brain tissue
Further details about MFBBN

Industrial Partners


“Together this academic-industry partnership has the mutual objective of advancing clinical opportunities in medical technology, advancement of scientific endeavor through publications, and providing security for intellectual property for the purpose of securing a path to commercialisation.”

Dr Daniel Chew, Director
Neuromodulation
Translational Sciences,
Galvani Bioelectronics

Posted in Pathfinder.